How to Grow Onions Indoor

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How to Grow Onions Indoor

Onions are easy to grow both outdoors and inside.  If you don’t have the space for a garden outside, you can grow them  indoors. You can even have an endless supply of them if you do it just right since onions are a cut and come again vegetable.  (they will regrow from the original stock with roots.)

Here are a few of the ways to grow onions indoors.

Grow Onions from Discarded Onion Bottoms

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Slice Off Onion Bottom

  1. Chop off the onion bottom with all the roots still intact.  The more of a bottom you leave on, the better.  Try for 1.5″-2″
  2. Allow to dry for a few hours to a couple days in a shaded, well-ventilated area to allow for callousing.

Note:  You might only need a few hours for callousing.  If the cut portions are dry to the touch and slightly shriveled, it very well might be calloused enough.

Potting

  1. Fill the starter pot with potting soil 2/3 of the way full and compact.
  2. Create an indentation in the center to cradle the onion bottom and allow for good soil contact.
  3. Cover with 1-2″ of soil.
  4. Water as needed.

Note:  You can skip the starter pot if you can’t be bothered and plant it directly in the ground.

Grow Spring Onions 

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– Buy one clump of spring onions at the store.

-Use your green onion as you normally would, but reserve the roots and keep at least one to two inches of the white bulb intact.

-Place the rooted bulbs in a glass with water by a window.

-In just a couple of days, the green stalks will start growing back.

-In about a week, you’ll be able to use them again.

Just be sure to change the water ever couple of days and rinse the bulbs. And it doesn’t stop with green onions.

 

Grow onions vertically on a window sill

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Grow onions vertically on a window sill.  You will need a 5 liter bottle that you have made holes in. Fill it with potting soil and onion sprouts and watch your harvest grow indoors!

Growing Sprouted Onions

Do you ever reach into the onion bin and find one that has sprouted?  Don’t just use part of it and discard.  Put that sprouted part to work.  Slice into the onion to expose the sprout and carefully cut the onion in two (take care not to disturb the sprout).   Carefully cut around the sprout and plant.  You can use the part not planted but will end up with another onion too!

  • Buy some onions and let them sprout in your pantry or a drawer…wherever, really.
  • Peel the outer papery layers, like you would if you were going to chop the onion, taking care to preserve any roots that might be growing between layers:

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  • Cut into the onion, nearly to the center, trying to avoid the sprouting center portion:

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  • Remove the rest of that half of the onion, exposing the center:

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  • Carefully cut around the base, removing the rest of the second half of the bulb, until you just have the center left:

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  • You can eat the portion that you removed, as long as it hasn’t gotten mushy. You might want to discard any parts that have started to get kind of “leafy” (like the dark purple tops of the center of this onion).
  • Take your sprouted onion center(s) and plant them in soil, with the white roots down and the green part sticking up.

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  • Water them, give them sun, and watch them grow! you can pull them up any time after you see the onion bulb starting to stick up above the soil.
  • You can also eat the green shoots (these are called Spring onions or scallions)you can also do without preserving the sprouted (green) portion and just planting the root part which has started to grow. Just cut off the bulb and plant the roots (sticking down) and water it.Picture4

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This article was written by Sharpex Blog Team

Sharpex Blog Team is in charge of curating this blog - writing and editing new posts, managing comments and feedback, getting guest bloggers on board and most importantly, marketing the blog. Reach out to us through admin@sharpexblog.com

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