10 Slug and Snail Resistant Flowers

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10 Slug and Snail Resistant Flowers

Unfortunately, the food of choice for some Slugs and snails might end up being your prized dahlia flower that you have spent hours nurturing and caring for. The second you dig a hole and leave it to fend for itself, it becomes a slug’s meal for the night. It’s incredibly frustrating and costly to have your plants eaten by a pesky slug. You have options though. You could be cruel and put something down to kill them. But many are moving away from this; for instance, maybe you don’t like harmful chemicals in your garden which could poison other wildlife such as hedgehogs, who given the chance would help you out by eating the slugs. Not all species of slug or snail will eat your plants and some are helpful at keeping the real pests at bay. Putting down slug pellets is also extra hassle and expense. So the easiest and kindest way to deal with this is to plant flowers which they do not like the taste of. Here is a list to give you a few ideas.

Lavender

Lavender

The first option is to plant a fragrant and attractive shrub such as lavender. There are several variants which can be found in hues such as blues, lilac and purple. They will attract bees to your garden and the lavender can also be put to a variety of uses if dried out or made into oils.

Astilbe

Astilbe

Astilbe has a Soft feathery look and can be found in many different variants. They can be planted in wet and shady conditions which makes them a good contender for gardens with ponds or moist soil areas.They add a mass of red, white or pink and interesting texture.

Centaureamontana (bachelor’s button)

Centaureamontana (bachelor's button)

This very attractive purple flower has a spiky appearance. Flowering time is from late spring to mid-summer and it should be located in sun or partial shade. It is naturally found in forests and meadows throughout Europe.

The Mexican Aster – Cosmos

The Mexican Aster – Cosmos

Delectate and light, these brightly coloured flowers have a yellow centre, and feathery green foliage. They are easy to grow from seed and need a full sun position to flourish. Slugs and snails have been known on occasion to chomp on these, but it is rare and still a solid choice.

LamprocapnosSpectabilis (Bleeding Heart)

LamprocapnosSpectabilis (Bleeding Heart)

Bleeding Hearts are delicate, drooping, heart shaped flowers. These flowers like regular watering and a partial shade location. They will bloom in spring and can re-bloom again later in the year.

Trailing Lobelia

Trailing Lobelia

Small flowers, ideal for borders or hanging baskets. The trailing lobelia will flow over a wall or over the edge of a hanging basket to create an attractive waterfall type effect. They will cover an area with a blanket of colour in many different shades.

Tanacetum coccineum (Robinsons Daisy)

Tanacetum coccineum (Robinsons Daisy)

Large brightly coloured flower heads with fern-like leaves. Flower early to mid-summer.They can be used to keep small insects like aphids away. So lots of reasons to plant some of these!

Star of Persia (Allium christophii)

Star of Persia (Allium christophii)

Is a perennial with a large mass of star shaped blooms forming a sphere. They are extremely hardy and thrive in a well sheltered, full sun location.

Johnson’s BlueGeranium

Johnson's BlueGeranium

Purple medium sized flowers. Easy to grow and maintain. A good choice for borders as it provides a good amount of coverage and colour. Flowers May to August and can also be planted in shade. Very little maintenance required.

About the Author:
Genuine Garden Services have a host of interesting plant advice and gardening tips articles on their blog. For further information on garden maintenance services, please contact them.


 

 

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